🇱🇻Visiting Riga, Lativa

I visited Riga, Latvia in October 2017 as part of a visit to the Chernobyl nuclear exclusion zone. I discovered a beautiful city that I would love to return to and explore more, along with the rest of the Baltic states.

More photos in the Flickr album.

Riga Cathedral

Riga is small, walkable city with a well persevered Gothic Old Town surrounded by a river and a canal ring with a string of lovely parks. Most of the sights and destinations are within walking distance of Old Town. 

The city is full of architecture, culture, parks, nightlife, and history. It has a bit of a reputation for stag and hen party trips from the UK, but overall is very laid back. 

Safety is not an issue. Riga is clean, safe, and family-friendly. The people are friendly and helpful, if a bit shy when sober.

Canal ring around Old Town

Riga is an accessible place to start if it’s your first time in the former Soviet Union or a Soviet satellite country. The culture, cityscape, and vibes are very European – but with a US Midwestern feel. The Occupation Museum near the canal is a great way to learn about life under the Soviets, and the Nazis before them.

Further afield, the Centrs is surrounded by old Soviet-style apartment blocks that Riga is now reclaiming and modernizing

Monument to Russian poet Alexander Pushkin in one of the canal-side parks.

Art Deco

Art Deco Museum

Just outside the Old Town is the newer Centrs district and the Art Deco District. Riga is known for having the world’s largest collection of buildings in this style. The Art Deco museum is a great small museum worth a visit to learn more about the city’s architecture.

View from Old town across the river to western Riga

Food and Drink

Lido Latvian restaurant has several locations around the city, including the Old Town. Authentic local food served cafeteria-style. Kitschy atmosphere but popular with the locals. Great value. 

Black Balsam is the Latvian liquor. It’s super bitter and super strong, but I did enjoy the version with black current. 

Riga Central Market
The largest public market in Europe is an old Nazi-era complex of Zeppelin airship hangers that can easily take up a full day’s worth of wandering around. The buildings are stunning and the number of vendors is enormous.

Riga Central Market (Google Street View)

Each hanger is devoted to a different food (meat, veggies, fish, etc.). There is a maze of merchandise stalls surrounding the hangers, including a big section selling second-hand Soviet kitsch. Many of the farmers and smaller food stall vendors speak limited English, but pointing and gestures will get you by.

More things to see and do

Easy Wine and Easy Beer
Self-serve bars for sampling many local, European, and international beers and wines.

SemeraH Hotel Metropole and De Commerce Gastro Pub
Hotel and pub near in the Old Town

Taverna Kirbis (Pumpkin) 
In the vegetable and produce hall.

Narvesen
Convenience store chain

The Armoury
Bar in the Old Town, with guns.

Omas Briljanta Istaba
Bar, live music, and food in the Old town

Cafe Britt Shop
Coffee in the Art Deco district

Gan Bei
Japanese restaurant in the T/C Gallerija Centrs shopping mall

Caffeine
Coffee in Centrs.

Tiger
Gift shop in Centrs.

Aspara Tea House
Lovely little place in the park on the south end of the canal.

One of the many, many small parks around the city

Money, Language, Transport

Latvia is on the euro, but prices are much lower than the average European city.

English is widely spoken. Learn a few key phrases in Latvian to be respectful of the locals. Russian is also common.

Most of the things for visitors are within walking distance of Old Town or Centrs districts. Buses, trams, and bike share are readily available. The airport small and well-designed, close to the city. Taxify is the most common taxi and ride share app.

 Trams
Bike share at the Cathedral

👻 Funders who ghost

Here’s how the story goes. You identify a potential funder that looks like a good fit. Then you reach out and get a meeting. The meeting goes really well. The funder is enthusiastic about your organization and your program. You reach consensus a proposal that they indicate would be fundable. A few days later you submit a great proposal, and then

You wait.

And wait.

And wait.

You send a follow-up email to confirm the funder received your proposal and ask if they have any questions for feedback.

And you wait some more.

Crickets.

You email again.

You go old school and call, leaving a voicemail.

Finally you give up and make a mental note to shade the funder when you run into them at the next nonprofit conference or happy hour.

I find these funders who ghost to be incredibly unprofessional, and all too common. Even more so in Kansas City where people are too polite, when actually ignoring a colleague like this is very impolite.

Maybe the funder is too busy to reply, too busy to say no, or too busy to give feedback. So? We are all too busy to do some of the basic parts of our jobs, but we make the time anyway. If didn’t, we would gain a reputation as unprofessional and unreliable.

Ginning up the courage to say no or to disappoint someone is a sign up professionalism and personal integrity. Wasting a colleague’s time shows a lack of both qualities.

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