Back to the Blog by Dan Cohen

Back to the Blog (Dan Cohen)
One of the most-read pieces I’ve written here remains my entreaty “Professors Start Your Blogs,” which is now 12 years old but might as well have been written in the Victorian age. It’s quaint. In 2006, many academics viewed blogs through the lens of LiveJournal and other teen-oriented, over...
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A year with the IndieWeb, posted March 14, 2018

A year with the IndieWeb by Eli MellenEli Mellen (eli.li)
I’m approaching the 1 year anniversary of my being all in on the IndieWeb! NO REGRETS! To celebrate, I thought I’d go crazy and write a brief description of what I think the indeiweb is, and how I IndieWeb. What is the IndieWeb? People First and foremost, the IndieWeb is people — a really...

A digital pillow fort

Source: A year with the IndieWeb, posted March 14, 2018

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👻 Funders who ghost

Here’s how the story goes. You identify a potential funder that looks like a good fit. Then you reach out and get a meeting. The meeting goes really well. The funder is enthusiastic about your organization and your program. You reach consensus a proposal that they indicate would be fundable. A few days later you submit a great proposal, and then

You wait.

And wait.

And wait.

You send a follow-up email to confirm the funder received your proposal and ask if they have any questions for feedback.

And you wait some more.

Crickets.

You email again.

You go old school and call, leaving a voicemail.

Finally you give up and make a mental note to shade the funder when you run into them at the next nonprofit conference or happy hour.

I find these funders who ghost to be incredibly unprofessional, and all too common. Even more so in Kansas City where people are too polite, when actually ignoring a colleague like this is very impolite.

Maybe the funder is too busy to reply, too busy to say no, or too busy to give feedback. So? We are all too busy to do some of the basic parts of our jobs, but we make the time anyway. If didn’t, we would gain a reputation as unprofessional and unreliable.

Ginning up the courage to say no or to disappoint someone is a sign up professionalism and personal integrity. Wasting a colleague’s time shows a lack of both qualities.

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Reclaiming My Bookmarks

Reclaiming My Bookmarks by Aaron Davis (Read Write Respond)
A reflection on using my own blog to reclaim my bookmarks and then syndicate them to other sites, such as Twitter and Diigo. My one word this year is intent. For me this means many things, one of which is to consider my digital presence. In a post reflecting on Mark Zuckerberg’s attempts to fix ...
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Are Backbone Organizations Eroding the Norms that Make Networks Succeed?

Are Backbone Organizations Eroding the Norms that Make Networks Succeed? by Danielle M. Varda (Non Profit News | Nonprofit Quarterly)
to the extent that the backbone succeeds, it also can begin to erode community norms of collective accountability and engagement that gave rise to the network in the first place, undermining the very muscles and ligaments needed for coordinated action.